Posts tagged ‘RAKs’

Kindness is Becoming an Organ Donor


Kindness is attentive, considerate, friendly, and thoughtful. Kindness sees a need and fills it. Sometimes that need is commonplace like delivering a meal or writing a letter. Sometimes it requires more of a conscious effort like becoming an organ donor.

Becoming an organ takes more conscious effort because you have to think about death. Your death. And that is not a popular topic to dwell on.

There is a huge need for organs. Sure, it might sound creepy, but it is kind

113,000 people are on the organ donor transplant waiting list in the US according to July 2019 statistics. 20 people die each day before receiving a transplant. Only 36,528 transplants were done in 2018. There is clearly a lack of organs.

95% of adults agree with organ donation, but only 58% have signed up.

Did you know that one donor can save eight lives?

I live in California and so am interested in California stats. The following info came from the DMV.CA.Gov site:

  • More than 21,000 Californians are waiting for a second chance at life.
  • About 20% of those nationwide waiting for an organ transplant are Californians

Go here for more nationwide stats. 

Sign up today.

  1. Driver’s License. It is easy to sign-up for this when you apply for or renew your driver’s license (or identification card).
  2. Health App. You can sign up via the health app on your iPhone.
  3. State Donor Registry. It is easy and quick to register with your state’s donor registry. 
  4. Tell your family. Make sure you tell your family, your wishes. Talk to them even if they are resistant to the idea.

Read this book: Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadaversby Mary Roach. This book shows scientific contributions and ways cadaver research has impacted modern life.

Along with cadavers, the protagonists of Roach’s book are the doctors, technicians, and environmentalists who labor over decaying flesh for larger causes. Underlying the eleven chapters of Roach’s book is her clear-eyed belief that, despite the perceived indignity of dismemberment, the fate of cadavers may be better than that of corpses. In its usefulness for organ donation, science, and the environment, a cadaver is a “superhero.” Quote taken from ENotes.Com

Here is a video review of the book.

If you want you to donate your whole body, you’ll need to go to a local hospital to fill out extensive papers  That is something I want to do as I think we don’t need more coffins  I will not be in my body after I die  I like the idea of being helpful, even after I pass from this earth.

Your Turn . . . Are you an organ donor? If not, why not? … Have you thought about being a whole-body donor?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

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Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . Leave a comment

Kindness is Hosting a Card Making Workshop

Scroll down for the Landing Page (aka Table of Contents) for this Kindness series.

I just used two of my “praying for you” cards today – cards that I made at the workshop you gave us. And it felt like a real gift to be able to send these folks a handmade card. Thanks again for leading that workshop. And thanks for helping us make such awesome cards.”

I recently sent the above message to my friend, Gillian, who is on the Women’s Ministry Team at my church and is also a Stampin’ Up Demonstrator.

Gillian said, “I always tell people that card making is a two-part process. We get the joy of making something ourselves, sometimes with our friends. Then we brighten someone else’s day by gifting them with our handmade card.”

Most women I know like the idea of crafting. But many are insecure about their ability and so don’t make time in their schedule to do this at home.

Kindness is attentive, considerate, friendly, and thoughtful. And kindness sees a need and fills it.

A need we saw at our church was a card-making workshop. We had one last year which was well-received. And we will have one this year. Soon each attendee can have the two-fold blessing of creating something and then gifting that to someone else.

Kindness is Hosting a Card Making Workshop.

My Landing Page for This series . . . Sprinkling Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Your Turn . . . 

  • Do you like making cards? Come join our class.
  • When was the last time you recieved a handmade card? How did it make you feel?
  • What need do you see that you could fill?

Related Posts . . .

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . Leave a comment

Kindness is Trick-or-Treating

“Cor, all I have to say is, ‘Trick-or-Treat’ and people will give me sweets?” Robbie asked this multiple times during the car ride to Bentwaters Air Force base which was 80 miles northeast of London, England).

I assured him that was true. My two kiddos, Tim (6) and Elizabeth (5) had several Halloweens under their belt and knew the drill. But for Jamie (7) and Robbie (3 1/2) this was their first time since this holiday wasn’t observed in England. We had three more delightful Octobers together exchanging sweets for a three word sentence before we moved back to the United States.

Candy is universally loved whether you are a child or an adult. So I decided to give out Halloween candy to my neighbors as a way to get to know them. Of the 14 apartments near mine, i “knew” only one lady (because of her friendly cat.

However, this giving had a twist. I was going to reverse trick-or-treat.

  • I would go to their homes.
  • I would do this on a night other than Halloween because I hoped to catch my neighbors at home.
  • They didn’t have to say, ‘Trick-or-Treat.’
  • And if they weren’t home, I planned to leave the treats on the door step.

This is a sample of what I left for those who didn’t answer their door.

As a shy, introvert, I was so nervous. On the first night I went to six apartments.

  • I talked two people who were quite receptive to my gesture of friendship.
  • One lady ran from me into her apartment. I put the goodies by her front door.
  • Two apartments had packages on their porch, so I left my treats on top.
  • At one home, the occupant opened the door when I left. I heard the creaking so I said, “Oh, good, you are home.” Their reply was a slammed door. I left their treats on the door step.

I was so discouraged by these results. But last night, I tried it again. I dropped off treats for eight more apartments.

  • Two people weren’t home. Again I left their goodies by the door.
  • One person  didn’t answer the door. I could hear him talking. But he got treats, as well.
  • I talked to five neighbors! Four of the neighbors were happy to meet me.

In total six ladies were glad I knocked on their doors to introduce myself. Kindness is getting to know your neighbors. Kindness is reverse trick-or-treating to do just that.

Your Turn . . .  How well do you know your neighbors? . . . Would you try reverse trick-or-treating as a way to introduce yourself to your neighbors? Why or why not? . . . How did you get to know your neighbors?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Being a Friendly Driver

Related Posts . . . Rolls and Buns: A Communication Mishap . . . Kindness is Neighboring Well

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 5 comments

Kindness is Putting Away Shopping Carts

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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I arrived at the store ready to do a BIG shop. With a list in hand and a ticking clock, I went towards the cart coral inside. There wasn’t a single cart. Not one! I’ve never seen it empty before. I fumed a little as I went back out and grabbed one of the many carts that were parked by cars near the entrance.

Shopping done, on my way out of the store, I noticed that the in-store cart corral was still empty. I tucked my groceries into the trunk, and looked at my cell phone clock. I had finished early! 13 minutes early.

I put 13 minutes on my timer. Then I whizzed around gathering carts. I put the gathered carts into the outside cart corrals. Isn’t it funny that I didn’t want to get “caught” by a store employee. A few people thanked me. And one man said, “Why are you doing THEIR job?”

“So you can have a cart now and not have to come back outside,” I replied.

The older gentleman grunted as he took a cart from the cart cage. I whispered, “You’re welcome.”

Just as I was getting into my vehicle to drive away, a store employee was taking carts into the store. I don’t know whether I was spotted or not, but I did a spontaneous,13 minute, kind deed for the day. And it felt good.

Your Turn . . . Have you ever gathered a bunch of carts to return them? Did you feel conspicuous like I did? . . . Did you ever think of returning your shopping cart as an act of kindness? . . . What spontaneous act of kindness can you do today?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Praying

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 3 comments

Kindness is Looking Someone in the Eyes

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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One of the best joys of being the parent of an adult child is when they have children. Being a grandmother is an unexpected pleasure.  My two oldest grand children (5 and 2) keep me up to date on their lives by face timing me several times a week. And I am always surprised when I learn from them, even from one as young as five.

Recently, I spent several nights with my grand children. It was a full weekend of playing talking, walking, cuddling, photographing each other, and crafting. As I left to leave, Sofia said, “Grandma, let’s talk to each other tomorrow.”

“OK,” I replied. “I want to make that happen.”

And Grandma, don’t do anything else,” She added.

“What do you mean, Sofia?”

“Don’t do your dishes or anything during the time we are talking,” Sofia clarified.

 I thought it was okay to do my dishes or ironing when we were talking. But I understood then, that Sofia wanted me to look at her. That is why she always calls me on Face Time and not on the regular phone. She wants eye-to-eye contact.

And really, don’t we all. We want to know that someone is paying attention when we talk.

Have you had a conversation where there wasn’t much paying attention going on? Perhaps the TV was on or cell phones were in use. Or like me, you were busy doing chores.

While you might have been having a conversation with someone, did you feel neglected because the other person wasn’t paying attention to you? Or maybe you were the one doing the neglecting.

Conversation requires both people being involved in listening and speaking. And a meaningful way to show that we are focused on them is by looking at the other person, giving them our undivided attention.

Kindness is paying attention. It is looking at someone when they talk. It is not doing anything else.

 

 

Your Turn . . . How good of a listener are you?  . . . Do you prefer people look you in the eyes when you are having a conversation?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Leaving a Surprise in a Library Book

Related Posts . . .

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 3 comments

Kindness is Leaving a Generous Tip

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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How often do you eat out? Information from 2017 says Americans eat 18.2 meals outside the home each month. I eat out 5.1 times a month (on average). I don’t indulge as much as I’d like because of food issues and cost. Most of the that time I eat out with a large group of people. It is interesting to note the tipping habits of folks.

How much do you tip? I usually tip 20% because I REALLY appreciate the work provided by our server, dishwasher, busser, etc. I really appreciate not having to menu plan, shop, put the groceries away, cook, and then clean up. And I just like eating out. A friend recently said that her love language is eating out. Me, too. So I tip accordingly.

Both of my children have challenged me in my tipping. They remind me how little servers and other restaurant staff make. And in the long run, will I miss that extra couple of dollars? No, probably not.

I have done this act of kindness several times in the last year. I tip 50% of my bill. I should say I am not frequenting high scale restaurants. So my average tip (at the high-end) is $10. I do save up money for this act of kindness. I always feel a secret pleasure that I was able to do that. Before I go out, i decide if this is the day I’ll tip extra. I do so regardless of the service. Once my daughter asked me about that.

“Every one can have a bad day,” I replied.. “I want to bless that person. Maybe the extra tip will be seen for the kindness it is and change that person’s attitude. Maybe it will just let that person know they were seen.”

Leaving a generous tip is an act of kindness.

Your Turn . . . I am not telling you this to toot my own horn. I am telling you so that you can think and see if you’d like to do this, too. . . .  What kind of a tipper are you?  . . .  Do you think I am crazy or wasteful for tipping extra?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Neighboring Well

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 6 comments

Kindness is Being a Trail Angel: Giving Away Food at PCT Trail Heads

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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What do the following names have in common: Opera, Ghost Walker, Night Crawler, NOBO Lobo, Rocky, Tapeworm, Whippet?

Are they roller coaster rides? Movie titles? Diseases? Nick names for the Seven Dwarves?

None of the above. These are the trail names of Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) hikers, my daughter and I met Friday, June 29th at the Meiss Trailhead. This trailhead is 30 minutes west (by car) of South Lake Tahoe. It takes the hikers (on average) two months of hiking from Mexico to Meiss trailhead.

This summer my daughter and I planned to camp once a month. I slept in the car (or on a cot) while Elizabeth slept in an ultra-lightweight, easy-to-erect tent. She is preparing for her own thru-hike on the PCT.

Wood’s Lake was our June destination. For ease, we decided to bring only ready-to-eat food, no cooking necessary. Additionally, we filled our trunk with food not for us: 50 individual bags of chips, 50 individual packages of cookies, a grocery bag full of plums fresh from a friend’s tree, and a cooler full of watermelon slices.

Trail magic (also defined as random acts of kindness), the PCT, and camping merged quite nicely that June weekend.

While eating Friday’s breakfast (green smoothies made at home), Elizabeth and I went over our PCT Trail Magic strategy for the Meiss trailhead parking lot (a few car-minutes away). Yes, a parking lot!  The Pacific Crest Trail crosses Meiss parking lot which leads into Tahoe, 12 miles north, where hikers go off-trail to get their next batch of supplies.

The PCT is 2,650 miles long. The southern terminus is Campo, CA (25 feet from the US-Mexican border). The northern terminus is Manning Provincial Park, British Columbia (near the US-Canadian border eight miles into Canada). 90% of thru-hikers go north to south. If northbound (NOBO) hikers plan to finish in Canada before the snow arrives, they need to reach Tahoe by July 4th. It takes the hikers five-six months to traverse the trail. There are no official stats on how many hike the PCT yearly.

We launched our plan by displaying chips, cookies, and fruit on the asphalt behind my car. A green, poster board sign, held up by twin trekking poles, nestled in the car’s open trunk. The sign declared, “Trail Magic for PCT Hikers.”

We sat in camping chairs and waited for them. Soon we spied a lone man wearing a large backpack who used one trekking pole in order to reduce the impact on his tired legs.

“Are you hungry?,” my daughter asked. “We have food, if you are.”

The answer, this time and every time, was, “I am always hungry! Thanks.”

The Oreo and Nutter Butter cookies went fast. Frito Lay chips were preferred over the other chips. The FAVE food, however, was the fruit. We experienced the joy one hiker had when she cautiously bit into her very FIRST plum EVER. As juice dripped down her cheek, she reached into the bag for another one.

One hiker said as she slurped on an ice-cold, triangle slice of watermelon, “Mile after mile, I’ve been dreaming about watermelon. And here you have some. Dreams do come true!” “Thanks for this Trail Magic,” another piped in.

We learned that it had been 400 miles since they received any Trail Magic. Trail Magic can be food, drink, rides, or meaningful mementos like a pin that commemorates the year of the hike. In that parking lot, we were blessed for being a Trail Angel, one who gives out Trail Magic.

We stayed for four hours serving 32 hikers. They represented places such as Illinois, Florida, Georgia, Central America, Australia, and Hungary. Rocky, the 20-something from Hungary, is the first woman from her country to hike the PCT.

 “Your one random act of kindness may not change the world but it might make a difference in the life of someone today” ― Maria Koszler

Performing this small, random act of kindness, (RAK), was rewarding. We met many people doing something amazing. Being around people who are accomplishing a dream motivates me to do the same. Talking with folks from all over the world and from different walks of life, demonstrated how alike we are and that friendliness is a common denominator.

I will do this again in 2019. Why? Doing RAK’s is one way I can spread kindness in a world that is struggling. My daughter and I plan to give Trail Magic 200 miles south of the Meiss trailhead. I’d like to add soda, hand sanitizer, and chocolate to our initial repertoire (chips, cookies and fruit). Elizabeth is making up her own list of things to add.

Happy Trails to Rocky and the others that we met that day. I wish them Godspeed as they conquer the second half of this 2,650 mile trek.

 

 

Your Turn . . . Have you ever given or received trail magic? . . . If yes, in your opinion, what is the best item to give/receive? . . . Are you interested in doing this act of kindness? Some of my friends want to join me next summer.

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

My Landing Page for This series . . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Helping a Teacher With Classroom Supplies

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 4 comments

Kindness is Helping a Teacher with Classroom Supplies

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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I just read that 94% of teachers nationwide spend, on average, $479 of their own money each year on classroom supplies. That is a lot of money coming out of their own pockets. Many of these teachers also have children and are paying for supplies for their own children, as well.

These teachers used their own money  because they want their students to have basic supplies and experiences that enhance the quality of their education. They are being kind to their students; kind at a big cost to themselves personally.

Synonyms for kind include the following … thoughtful … considerate … charitable … sympathetic … philanthropic … neighborly … humane … generous … big-heated.

Since 2003 I’ve bought LOTS of school supplies to put into my Operation Christmas Child (OCC) boxes. I get these on sale all year round and have plenty of school items to include with the other gifts (hygiene, toys, clothing) I put inside the boxes.

Several years ago, I thought to ask two teachers I know, if I could get anything for their classrooms. Both needed coloured pencils. One teacher also asked for dry erase markers. This year I thought to ask another teacher friend and she also asked for dry erase markers.

I must confess, I don’t always think about them when I am shopping; whereas, OCC is always on my mind. But I want to change that mindset. I want to be kind to these teachers. So I texted and asked what I can get them. They responded with  . . .

  • erasers
  • black, dry erase markers
  • tissues
  • hot chocolate
  • pudding cups

A package of dry erase markers, coloured pencils, or tissues are things I can pick up when I grocery shop. Each item is less than $5, but is a huge benefit to my teacher friends, who all work in low-income and high homeless areas.

Sometimes being kind is about having open ears and eyes. And sometimes it is about spending $5 on a school item instead of on a carton of Ben & Jerry’s Cherry Garcia.

Your Turn . . . Do you buy supplies for a teacher’s classroom?  . . . Or have you been oblivious like me? My children are in their 30’s, so it hasn’t even been a thought to be kind in that manner. . . . If you are a teacher and/or already buy for a classroom, what are some items you’d suggest?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

My Landing Page for This series . . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Baking a Birthday Cake for Someone You Don’t Know

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 2 comments

Kindness is Baking a Birthday Cake for Someone You Don’t Know

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It is my hope that my community and I are different as a result of this 31 Day Series.

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Is birthday cake an important part of your childhood memories?

My answer is, “Yes.” I don’t remember all the cakes my mom made. But I do know that she made our cakes. A family favorite was German Chocolate cake. I don’t think I ever made my kiddos a German Chocolate cake. But I did always serve them a specially decorated cake that matched the theme of their birthday party. Receiving a homemade birthday cake always made me feel special. Giving my kiddos a homemade birthday cake, was one of the ways I hoped my kids would feel special.

Did you know that there are kiddos who never get a birthday cake? Never.

This is one of my practice cakes.

In 2010 Libby Gruender from Sunnyvale, CA read about a young girl in a Midwest foster home who received a birthday cake. The girl reacted by running to her room while crying. Of course the foster mom thought she had done something wrong and went upstairs to right the situation. It turns out, the girl was emotional because this was her very first birthday cake.

Gruender decided right then to make sure kids in her community received cake for their birthdays. That is why she created Cake4Kids. There are currently chapters in ten CA counties.

Mary Barnes started Sacramento Cake4Kids in July, 2018. So far there are about thirty Sacramento bakers. Volunteer bakers are required to attend a one-hour orientation. All the orientations are on a Saturday and are from 12:30-1:30pm. The schedule for the 2018 orientations is as follows:

  • The October 20th­­­­­ orientation will be held at Arcade library.
  • The November 10th orientation will be held at Arden-Dimick library.
  • The December 22nd orientations will be held at Arcade library.

This vegan, chocolate, gluten-free cake was the first cake I delivered to the agency for a four-year-old boy.

Knowing firsthand how getting a birthday cake equals feeling significant, I am now part of Cake4Kids. My daughter, Elizabeth, also joined this ministry and so the fun is doubled. So far we’ve each made one cake. Although we used the same recipe for the cake, our two cakes looked very different. My marbled cake was for a four-year-old boy. Elizabeth’s flower bedecked cake was for an 11-year-old girl.

There is no minimum number of cakes a volunteer must make. We are advised to practice even before we accept an assignment. And we are advised to make our cake and decorate it a day or two early. That way, should there be a mistake, it is not a rushed scenario to correct it.

You don’t have to be a fancy baker in order to make a valuable contribution. I am not a fancy baker although I’ve made scores of birthday cakes. A fun aspect of Cake4Kids is learning new things.

  1. I learned to bake a vegan cake that was tasty. Two sample cakes were thrown away.
  2. The vegan frosting recipe was easy to create.
  3. A chocolate cake is much easier to coat with white frosting, if you lightly pre-frost it, and then put it into the freezer or refrigerator to harden before putting on the main coat of frosting. This is known as dirty icing or crumb coating.
  4. YouTube videos helped me to perfect marbled frosting.
  5. I made chocolate letters out of melted chocolate chips spooned into an icing bag. I was pleased with how the letters I made looked.
  6. One tip that made sense is to use a turntable and a bench scraper (yes, from the hardware store) to ensure that the frosting is evenly distributed.

This is my daughter’s cake. It was also chocolate, vegan, and gluten-free. Both our cakes had vegan, vanilla, butter cream icing.

And this is just the tip of the information iceberg. There are many resources on Pinterest, in books, and at the Sacramento Facebook Cake4Kids group. Plus, Cake4Kids gives each volunteer $100 to use towards classes at cake shops and online.

Barnes recruits volunteers to bake birthday cakes for kids who are homeless, in foster care, recent immigrants, or victims of human trafficking. Cake4Kids is for children and young adults up to the age of twenty-four. Bakers never meet the kids who receive cakes. We drop them off at an agency in order to protect the child’s privacy. More information can be found at their website, Cake4kids.org.

If you’d like to be kind and bring joy into a child’s life, attend an orientation. Together we can help Sacramento area kiddos eat cake.

Your Turn . . .  How important is cake to your birthday celebrations? . . .  If you live in California, consider joining in and making cake as an act of kindness. . . . If you are a cake decorator, what is your best tip? . . . Do you have any questions?  

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment.

My Landing Page for This series . . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Organizing a Sock Drive

Related Posts . . .

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 13 comments

Kindness is Organizing a Sock Drive

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different

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 Socks are like a national right, right?

I don’t like having cold feet. I wear socks, not slippers, when feeling chilly. I love socks: plain, patterned, mismatched, whatever. I love socks.

So when I was asked to organize a sock drive for my church, I didn’t hesitate. The collected socks will go to folks who attend the October Neighborhood Meals (NM). Neighborhood Meals is a free community meal served the last Friday of every month at Cordova Neighborhood Church from 5:00 to 6:00 PM. If you are hungry, come and eat; if you’re not, come and serve.

Any type of sock is accepted. But Carla Wilson, a long-time organizer of NM, suggests we bring mainly men’s socks. Black socks are most requested because they don’t show the dirt so easily. These black socks are also comfy for women.

We already have 30 pairs of socks! We will be collecting until the end of the month. The socks will be dispersed at the Friday meal in October, the 26th. Please consider supporting this act of kindness.

Happiness is warm feet.

Kindness is giving someone socks so they can have warm feet.

Have you ever thought about organizing a sock drive? In 2008, Ryan Lundquist (from my area at that time) sought to collect 680 pairs of socks so that each homeless student in our school district could have a pair. The drive scored 3,144 pairs of socks!

Organizing a sock drive might be more energy than you are able to extend. How about donating one pair?

Can you imagine NOT having socks especially as we come into the rain and cold of Fall? 

Your Turn . . .  Are you at a time in your life, when you can take on organizing a sock drive?  . . . If you live in the Sacramento area, please consider this act of kindness, donating socks to the October Neighborhood Meals.  . . . If you don’t live near me, consider buying socks and donating them to your school district and/or local shelters. . . . 

Everyone deserves socks. 

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

My Landing Page for This series . . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Making a Phone Call

Related Posts . . . The Forks Eloped With The Socks!

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 5 comments

Kindness is Making a Phone Call

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It is my hope that my community and I are different as a result of this 31 Day Series.

___________________

People of every age group and every economic bracket are lonely. I work at a church and oversee the ministries to women and seniors (55 years and older). Men and women tell me they are lonely, lonely for time with family and friends. Many don’t have a sense of belonging. They feel unseen.

Does this describe you or someone you know?

Kindness looks at people and sees their needs. Sometimes the need is simply to notice. To ask questions. To listen. To share time and laughter.

“And never let ugly or hateful words come from your mouth, but instead let your words become beautiful gifts that encourage others; do this by speaking words of grace to help them.” Ephesians 4: 26-27, 29

Our kind words are gift wrapped in beauty with a bow of encouragement.

Give someone this gift of kindness. Today, make a call to a . . .

  • family member.
  • neighbor.
  • co-worker.
  • friend.
  • someone from church.
  • club member (book, civic, sorts).

Who would you add to this list?

 

Your Turn . . . Do you think of a phone call as an act of kindness? . . . When was the last time you received such a call? . . . Are you motivated to make a phone call today? . . . Do you have an act of kindness suggestion I can add to my list?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

My Landing Page for This series . . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Delivering Meals.

Related Posts . . .

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 6 comments

Kindness is Delivering Meals

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It is my hope that my community and I are different as a result of this 31 Day Series.

___________________

Many folks are willing to make a meal for someone else. But for a variety of reasons, they cannot deliver the meal, especially if the recipient doesn’t live locally. Therefore, they think they cannot be part of this act of kindness.

This is where I come in. I offer to deliver the meals. Even though I didn’t shop and prepare the meal, I get to be part of this act of kindness. Win-Win for everyone.

Sometimes being kind doesn’t take a lot of time or money.

But it is appreciated all the same.

Your Turn . . .  Have you ever been the driver of prepared meals? . . . Would you find it helpful to be part of such a team: food preparer and driver? . . . Please share any acts of kindness I can add to my list.

The next time you organize meals, ask if it would be helpful for someone else to deliver the meals. You don’t have to be the driver, as I bet there are others who will volunteer for that act of kindness.  . . .If you do this, please let me know how it goes.

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

My Landing Page for This series . . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Go here for yesterday’s post: Kindness is Organizing Meals.

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes.

. at . 9 comments

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