Posts filed under ‘Random acts of kindness’

Kindness is Becoming an Organ Donor


Kindness is attentive, considerate, friendly, and thoughtful. Kindness sees a need and fills it. Sometimes that need is commonplace like delivering a meal or writing a letter. Sometimes it requires more of a conscious effort like becoming an organ donor.

Becoming an organ takes more conscious effort because you have to think about death. Your death. And that is not a popular topic to dwell on.

There is a huge need for organs. Sure, it might sound creepy, but it is kind

113,000 people are on the organ donor transplant waiting list in the US according to July 2019 statistics. 20 people die each day before receiving a transplant. Only 36,528 transplants were done in 2018. There is clearly a lack of organs.

95% of adults agree with organ donation, but only 58% have signed up.

Did you know that one donor can save eight lives?

I live in California and so am interested in California stats. The following info came from the DMV.CA.Gov site:

  • More than 21,000 Californians are waiting for a second chance at life.
  • About 20% of those nationwide waiting for an organ transplant are Californians

Go here for more nationwide stats. 

Sign up today.

  1. Driver’s License. It is easy to sign-up for this when you apply for or renew your driver’s license (or identification card).
  2. Health App. You can sign up via the health app on your iPhone.
  3. State Donor Registry. It is easy and quick to register with your state’s donor registry. 
  4. Tell your family. Make sure you tell your family, your wishes. Talk to them even if they are resistant to the idea.

Read this book: Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadaversby Mary Roach. This book shows scientific contributions and ways cadaver research has impacted modern life.

Along with cadavers, the protagonists of Roach’s book are the doctors, technicians, and environmentalists who labor over decaying flesh for larger causes. Underlying the eleven chapters of Roach’s book is her clear-eyed belief that, despite the perceived indignity of dismemberment, the fate of cadavers may be better than that of corpses. In its usefulness for organ donation, science, and the environment, a cadaver is a “superhero.” Quote taken from ENotes.Com

Here is a video review of the book.

If you want you to donate your whole body, you’ll need to go to a local hospital to fill out extensive papers  That is something I want to do as I think we don’t need more coffins  I will not be in my body after I die  I like the idea of being helpful, even after I pass from this earth.

Your Turn . . . Are you an organ donor? If not, why not? … Have you thought about being a whole-body donor?

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

_____________________________________________

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

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Kindness is Hosting a Card Making Workshop

Scroll down for the Landing Page (aka Table of Contents) for this Kindness series.

I just used two of my “praying for you” cards today – cards that I made at the workshop you gave us. And it felt like a real gift to be able to send these folks a handmade card. Thanks again for leading that workshop. And thanks for helping us make such awesome cards.”

I recently sent the above message to my friend, Gillian, who is on the Women’s Ministry Team at my church and is also a Stampin’ Up Demonstrator.

Gillian said, “I always tell people that card making is a two-part process. We get the joy of making something ourselves, sometimes with our friends. Then we brighten someone else’s day by gifting them with our handmade card.”

Most women I know like the idea of crafting. But many are insecure about their ability and so don’t make time in their schedule to do this at home.

Kindness is attentive, considerate, friendly, and thoughtful. And kindness sees a need and fills it.

A need we saw at our church was a card-making workshop. We had one last year which was well-received. And we will have one this year. Soon each attendee can have the two-fold blessing of creating something and then gifting that to someone else.

Kindness is Hosting a Card Making Workshop.

My Landing Page for This series . . . Sprinkling Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Your Turn . . . 

  • Do you like making cards? Come join our class.
  • When was the last time you recieved a handmade card? How did it make you feel?
  • What need do you see that you could fill?

Related Posts . . .

Previous #Write31Days Topics

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth is writing a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

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Kindness is Planting a Tree

Kindness is doing something that is thoughtful and beneficial. Taking care of our planet by planting trees falls into that category.

Several years ago, some ladies from my church and I went camping at Smudea campground in Northern California.. One of the activities was to plant seedling trees. It was a meaningful time for all of us. Ever since then, I’ve wanted to plant more trees.

I don’t think you can have too many trees in any city.

My city is having a tree planting event on Saturday, March 28. My daughter and I are going. Want to join us? The details are below

March 28 — Cordova Meadows Neighborhood & Taylor Park Planting

Saturday, March 28 8:45A – 12:00P

Join us in planting trees in the Cordova Meadows area of Rancho Cordova! The trees we plant will improve mental health, create more breathable air, and reduce negative health outcomes such as asthma and cardiac disease!

Go here for more information.

Your Turn . . . Have you ever planted seedling trees? … Been to a tree planting party? … Do you know the song about Johnny Appleseed?

Related Posts …

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

My Landing Page for This series . . . Sprinkling Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure.  Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

Thanks go to Elizabeth Symington for making my #Write31Days button and basic graphic for the kindness quotes. Elizabeth wrote a 31 days series on Summer of Service in Yosemite.

. at . 1 comment

Kindness is Calling Someone by Their Name

Scroll down for the Landing Page information  (aka Table of Contents) for this Kindness series.

“A person’s name is to him or her the sweetest and most important sound in any language.”   Dale Carnegie.

If a name tag is present, I will call a nurse, wait staff, or a receptionist by their name. I think calling them by their name acknowledges them and shows respect.

I like name tags. Wearing a nametag makes me feel more connected because if others are wearing one as well, we have the option of calling each other by name. There is less awkwardness. I want the person I am addressing to know I believe they are important. Using a person’s name has that power.

Using a person’s name is thoughtful, attentive, considerate, and friendly. In short, it is kind.

In the past two years, the people at my church have been wearing nametags. This has allowed me to learn the names of many people. Seeing that visual reinforcement week-after-week is helpful since I am a visual learner.

I believe others also find this a useful way to learn names. Regular attenders are not the only ones who benefit. Newcomers are also impacted. We can greet each other by name. I believe this adds to the friendliness of our church.

Calling folks by their name is, indeed, a kind thing to do.

Your Turn . . .

  • Do you call people you see on a regular basis by their name?
  • How do you feel when someone calls you by your name?

Related Posts . . . 

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

_____________________________________________

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

 

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Kindness is Sitting With Someone

On most Sundays, a majority of people sit in the same spot at church. They do this out of habit, so they can see or hear better, so they can socialize with their seat buddies, or so they can leave the sanctuary mid-service (for a potty break or to tend a child) without disturbing a lot of people.

Plus, doing so brings pleasant feelings. Regularly sitting in the same area gives people a sense of belonging and familiarity. These feelings enhance the worship experience.

If you are new, shy, or haven’t made friends yet, you probably don’t have a set seat. And worse yet, if you take someone’s set-seat, sometimes you are given a frown or shooed away. All this can lead to feeling like an outsider.

Let me suggest one thing. The next time you go to church, sit with someone who is alone. Or invite him/her to sit with you. Doing this sends the message that you are inviting him/her into your sphere of friends. It is a kind thing to do.

Kindness is making a point to sit with someone who is alone.

Need a refresher on what kindness looks like? Kindness is caring, considerate, friendly, hospitable, observant. A kind person wants others to feel like they, too, belong.

Your Turn . . .

  1. Do you have a special spot you like to sit when you attend church?
  2. How do you feel when someone sits there?
  3. When was the last time you purposefully sat with someone who was alone?
  4. Tell about a time someone did that for you.

Related Posts . . .

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

_____________________________________________

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

. at . 1 comment

Kindness is Writing a Letter

 

Do you write letters on a regular basis?

I like to. In fact, I have several letter writing projects on this blog.

However, I got bogged down and didn’t keep either project as an ongoing habit.

Today I received a letter from a friend who lives locally. She moved to a different area and attends a different church. I let my life overrun my schedule. We were out-of-touch with one another. My friend gave a recap of her year and shared answered prayers. I felt such joy reading about the faithfulness of God in her life.

Her letter reminded me of our shared interests and love for one another. Her letter rekindled a desire to make this friendship a priority. I texted her right away to say, “Yes, let’s meet up.”

This weekend, I will take time to write her. Yes, I will do that even though we will see one another soon. I want my friend to receive the same joy I had after reading her letter to me. After all, kindness is writing a letter.

Can writing a letter really be called kindness? Yes! If the letter is attentive, considerate, friendly, and thoughtful, it is a kind act. Both the writer and recipient benefit from this kind act. Such letters reaffirm friendship, reminisce on shared history, and remind of what’s important in life – people.

I want to get back to my letter-writing habit. It is a great way to let others know how important they are to me. So, I am going back to setting aside the third Sunday of each month as a letter-writing time. (March 15th will be my first time to do this.) Of course, I can write more letters than this, but my realistic goal is once a month.

Your Turn . . .

  • Do you think letter writing is an important habit to cultivate?
  • Do you see it as an act of kindness?
  • When was the last time you wrote a letter? How did you feel after writing it? How was it received?
  • Will you write a letter this week?

Related Posts . . . 

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

_____________________________________________

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

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Kindness is Feeding People

Food is at the center of American activities. Food is a necessity and a luxury. It is a joy and it bonds people. Denise, a woman who oversaw the kitchen at our church felt that when food was served at an event, people felt welcomed and at ease.

There are many ways we can share food as an act of kindness. Be sure to add your ideas to this list.

  • Invite someone over for dinner.
  • Take an extra portion of your sack lunch contents to give to a co-worker.
  • Make cookies for a neighbor or the school crossing guard.
  • Make an acceptable goodie for someone who has food allergies. Getting a treat like this is rare and makes the recipient feel noticed.
  • Take a meal to someone who needs help (a new mom, someone just home from the hospital, someone who is grieving). I think a just-because meal would be gratefully accepted, too.
  • Buy gift cards to fast food restaurants to give to a teenager or homeless person.
  • Donate food to the food pantry or to a program like Neighborhood Meals (NM).

NM is a free community meal served at my church (near Sacramento, CA) the last Friday of every month. If you are hungry, come and eat; if you’re not, come and serve. We have room for people to help in the following positions: set-up, clean-up, serve food, help our guests take food to the table, and visit with the guests while you both eat. We also take food and clothing.

“There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi

When someone is hungry and doesn’t have easy access to food because of homelessness, pain, depression, or recuperation, that is a vulnerable state to be in.

Kindness is noticing that food is a necessity and brings comfort and acceptance. Kindness is feeding people.

Your Turn . . . When was the last time you performed this act of kindness? . . .  When was the last time someone gave you food? . . . How did either/both situations make you feel.? . . . Who can you gift food to this week? 

Related Posts . . . 

Go here for yesterday’s post . . . Kindness is Trick-or-Treating

You can practice being kind by leaving me a comment. 

Please leave me an idea or two that I can add to my acts of kindness list. The idea can be intentional or random.

_____________________________________________

Want to know what other acts of Kindness are on the list? Go to my Landing Page . . Scattering Kindness: A 31 Day Adventure of Intentional & Random Acts of Service.  

This post is part of #Write31Days where bloggers write every day in October on one topic. I am writing about Acts of Kindness, random and otherwise. It will be interesting to note how I am different and/or how my community is different.

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Older Posts


60 Acts of Kindness, Intentional & Random to do my 60th year

The Finish DateMarch 1st, 2019

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